Boiled Glass

04/17/10 – Boiling Glass – Boiling glass, also called boiled glass is a high fire procedure that’s executed within a kiln. While glass does not boil in the same way water boils, whenever heated up to a piercing enough temperature, a lot of glass will lose elements in its composition and begin to vaporize. This age-old Klaus Moje process produces what is like boiling glass.

Roughly the most beneficial facts on the web concerning this operation are the TechNotes #4 by Bullseye. If you view the remarks on “Heat and Glass” you’ll discover that they demonstrate with a graph that shows what occurs as glass becomes hotter within the kiln. Between 1600-1700 degrees Fahrenheit burps start to appear from the lowest layer and up through the surface level.

When the glass becomes hotter, entrapped bubbles start to ascend to the top surface. This is induced by the advanced temperature within the kiln and the chemical alterations in the glass when it starts to become more liquid. When the bubbles start displacing toward the top surface they pull the coloration upwards through the assorted levels. So, while the glass in reality does not boil, the protruding bubbles impart a visual aspect of boiling the glass.

Boiled glass can be fabulously uncertain. A few people will say that glass will not boil, but attempt this process and you’ll become a believer. Through the usage of advanced heat the lowest colorations bubble up to the crown level. In this technique, they impart their individual key signature and create exceptional blueprints in the glass.

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